Tag Archives: graduation

Ever wonder what you might do after your PhD?

Vicky was a PhD student at the School of Nursing and Midwifery nearly two years ago and has kindly written a blog piece for us, telling us a little bit about what her life has been like post – PhD…

Following a BSc and MSc in psychology, I completed my PhD at Cardiff University in the department of Nursing and Midwifery in 2010. My research focused in the area of health psychology and addressed psychosocial predictors of PTSD, anxiety and depression in first admission acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. This research involved developing a cardiac specific threat and coping questionnaire and working hands on, in a hospital environment, with acute cardiac patients. I discovered through out this research that the part of the PhD I found particularly rewarding was working within a clinical environment and having face-to-face contact with patients. This confirmed my long-term goal to pursue a career in clinical psychology.

Life can sometimes feel as if it is on hold towards the end of your PhD but I have found that it soon picks up pace after hand in! Following completion of my viva in early 2011, I married my then boyfriend of four years James. We decided to take an extended honeymoon by travelling to New Zealand for a year in order to work and explore. We settled in the Northland of New Zealand and I worked as part of nation wide research team for Otago University. This research was a Multi-level Intervention for Suicide Prevention (MISP) project. I worked as the northland representative looking at the efficacy of a series of intervention upon ED presentations for suicide, suicide ideation and self-harm. 

As this research contract draws to a close, my husband and I are currently in the process of applying for residency in New Zealand so that we have the option to stay a bit longer and I am applying for clinical psychology training both in the UK and in Wellington, NZ. Coming to the end of a PhD was a scary transition in to ‘real life’ but the gap left in my life by the PhD was soon be filled with numerous other opportunities and I look back fondly on my student days.

 

Back to Skool

It’s been a busy and successful year. So here are some of our highlights…

  • Dr Sally Anstey obtained her PhD with minor corrections.
  • Amie Hodges and Nikki West were awarded Florence Nightingale Foundation Scholarships to support their part-time PhD’s.
  • Mandayachepa Nyando and Mohammad Marie were awarded £1,250 prize from the University as our outstanding students of the year.
  • Shema Amer was recently honoured by King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia as a high achieving postgraduate.
  • Nikki West has been shortlisted for the Royal College of Nursing ‘Nurse of the Year’.
  • Jessica Baillie obtained a post-doctoral position in the Medical School.

We are very proud of you all….

Welcome to our new students starting this year… Marie Lewis, Ahmed Alghamdi, David (Abdulrahman) Aldawood, Ani (Aniawanis) Makhtar, Nasiha Al-Braiki, Laura Goodwin, Dave Evans, Jane Davies, Sarah Fry, and Hama (Hamadziripi) Ngandu.

Well done to all of you for securing funding and also well done to Nasiha and Ani who have also been awarded International Research Scholarships by the University.

We are really pleased that we have been able to extend the PGR suite so that you can all have a desk and will be in the same room. We look forward to seeing your projects develop.

We also have a few highlights to look out for in the coming year….

  • Our new doctoral training programme includes regular seminars and methods ‘masterclasses’ throughout the year (available to download from our main PGR page).
  • 5 of you are close to submission so we are looking forward to a busy graduation next summer.

Your evaluation has put us in the top three of the 25 PGR programmes in Cardiff University in terms of overall student satisfaction. However, of course we want to improve on this, so let us know if there is anything we can do… our doors are always open.

Katie and Rosemary

“So long, farewell, auf Wiedersehen, goodbye. I leave and heave a sigh and say goodbye”

I was always warned that my three years of PhD funding would fly by and while I did not doubt it, I am still amazed at the pace with which it has disappeared.  The exciting news is that I will soon be starting as a Research Assistant in the School of Medicine at Cardiff University, but that means that it is time to say goodbye to theSchool of Nursing and Midwifery Studies.

I know that I’ve said it a lot, but the last three years really have been a brilliant experience.  Not only have I learned how to plan and undertake qualitative research, I’ve also learned all about other research designs and approaches.  I’ve had the boundaries of my knowledge and understanding well and truly pushed, although my partner is fed up of me interpreting everything according to a social constructionist perspective!

I’ve also had the chance to take part in such a variety of other activities and projects.  During the last three years I’ve regularly taught clinical skills, which has been a fantastic opportunity.  I discovered that I love teaching students, particularly when they are at the beginning of their journey to becoming a nurse and you can teach the importance of fundamental care, skills and attitudes.  It’s also been a privilege to teach students nearing the end of their nursing journeys research, seeing their enthusiasm for the profession and their interest in learning how to move the evidence-base forward.

My organisational skills have progressed during my PhD to the point of obsessive, which I made great use of when helping to organise two conferences in the University.  Having attended conferences for several years, helping to plan two was a great and unique experience.  In particular, it was very interesting to work with an inter-disciplinary team to organise the Spotlight on Social Sciences conference, highlighting to me the differences between our research projects and perspectives in general of research.

However, it is the people in the School of Nursing and Midwifery Studies and beyond that have made this PhD such a wonderful experience.  I’ve been lucky to share an office with a brilliant group of people, who I will miss terribly when I can no longer fill them in on the banalities of my everyday life.  I couldn’t have asked for better supervisors, while the support from administrators and IT has been fantastic.  I’ve learned such a lot from the research and teaching staff in the school, who welcomed and supported me throughout.

To conclude, I’ve also learned something very important about myself (that I will have to try and change when I leave): that I write best in my jogging bottoms and no make-up, listening to soft opera, preferably in Italian (so I can’t try and sing along), in the morning.

Thanks everybody and I will see you in the evenings and weekends (maybe) when I return to the PhD office to finish the small task of my thesis…