Tag Archives: Cardiff and Vale

A Reflection – by Jane Davies

Reflection – Year two, Term two

Having just returned from the Easter weekend to begin the final term of year two, I realise how quickly time is moving. I am now half way through the study with writing, data collection and analysis ahead of me. In many ways this has felt like one of the most productive phases of the work to date.

It began in January when I returned after the Christmas break to finalise the R and D approval from the main site for my research. This had been in the only word I can think of a tortuous process, which became more and more frustrating leading up to the Christmas break. I was fully aware that it was going to be difficult but I think I underestimated my ability to cope with just how much energy it takes to get to the data collection stage. I was well supported throughout the process and many people gave advice and helped.

Nevertheless I was given approval at the main site and my research passport was issued, which meant that I could begin the work at the main site. I still had to wait for approval at the subsidiary site, which did not come until April. I met with my contact for recruitment in mid-January who as always was extremely encouraging and helpful. She offered to have a look through the current patient list and then we could discuss who might be a suitable case, taking into account the inclusion exclusion criteria. She soon contacted me saying that she had two possibly three young people who might be suitable for the study. She offered to give an information sheet to those selected and I waited for her to contact me.

I have to say I have been heartened by the fact that the young people approached so far have been keen to take part. I was of the view that this wouldn’t be the case and that I would have trouble recruiting. I undertook my first interview on 3rd February 2014. I felt nervous and unsure of my ability to conduct the interview successfully. I checked and re checked my tape recorder for fear that it would not work to an almost ridiculous extent. I think this was that I realised how precious these conversations were and that I would be unable to recapture them a second time. It went quite well but I am not sure if I probed enough and felt that I probably could have learned more.

Jane blog 2Even though it was only the beginning of February I was already feeling tired. It was good that I had booked a holiday in February and a short break with friends in March as these trips have since re-energised me particularly with reference to data collection. I was advised that data collection would be tiring and that my sample would probably have some stories that I found upsetting. This indeed was the case. I have spent many quiet moments especially when out walking when I have reflected on the difficulties and challenges which face these young people. This was brought to life more than ever very recently. I was on my way to attend an outpatient appointment for a young man with an osteosarcoma who before his cancer had been a keen sportsman. He had required an amputation just above his knee. As I was walking, I saw a young man in the distance who I recognised I had watched playing school age rugby. He is now a professional player who has an international cap and is a first year student at medical school. The contrast in the two situations really struck me and I thought about how their two lives were so different for young men of the same age.

I have continued to recruit cases and now have three young people in the study. My interviewing is improving as I gain confidence. I have also interviewed family and friends of each case which has provided a different but very worthwhile perspective. I still swing between absolute terror and a feeling that I am coping better and understanding more. It is very uncomfortable (the terror aspect) however I am reassured that this is a normal part of this type of study. I am beginning to write reflexive accounts following the interviews and to try and look for key messages in the transcripts. I have used a small number of codes, which are enabling me to identify specific decision making events within each interview. I have no idea what a lot of it means yet but hope it will start to fit together at some point. It certainly occupies a lot of my thinking time!

I have continued to access training throughout this term and have been to some writing clubs, a rapid reading programme and some seminars in SOCSI. I have also made progress in disseminating my work with a poster accepted at a local and international conference. I have also secured a residency in Geneva next year in July, which will provide an opportunity for writing and sharing my work and ideas with others who are also writing for various purposes. This is something that I am looking forward to enormously. I need to stay focused and ensure that when I go to the residency I am at the right stage to really do justice to the writing that I will undertake there.

I am looking forward to the summer term and the experience of meeting with more young people and their families and to developing some more skills in research data collection. I am also going to try and write alongside this when I can, which will include the submission of a paper which I am currently working on.

Nurse of the year award 2012

I was delighted to be nominated for the RCN specialist nursing award this year. A colleague asked if she could nominate me because she felt that running my nurse led diagnostic, follow up and counselling clinics and leading the service that Breast care patients receive was wonderful. A friend of both of us had recently been diagnosed with breast cancer and had experienced the journey through to diagnosis in my clinic and it was at this point that she realised how nurses with advanced clinical skills can make a real difference. She was also nominating me for doing my PhD at this grand old age and being successful in getting a Florence Nightingale research scholarship this year. My nominator put together a very moving, complimentary summary of my achievements to date and why she felt I should receive the Nurse of the year award.

Following submission to the Royal college of Nursing judges, I was shortlisted for an interview and had to present my work and achievements over the last 20 years but especially the last year to a panel of senior nurses, academics and Welsh Assembly government members. Although it was really strange presenting what I had done in breast care since taking up post in 1991 and I felt like I was showing off, it also brought it home to me how much of my nursing career I have devoted to the speciality and what I have actually achieved. The panel were delighted and I came out feeling really positive. A few days later I had a letter to say I was a finalist at City Hall on the 28th November. That in itself was a great feeling and the fact that somebody had taken the time and effort to write a statement about my work and dedication to nursing was amazing. I didn’t realise that there was a winner and a runner up for each category at the awards and in total there were 9 different categories but when I heard this, I was sure I would be the runner up of my category because there is so much extraordinary work being conducted by all grades of nursing staff across Wales and I was so grateful just to be there.

The evening at City Hall was absolutely fantastic. The food was delicious, the company was excellent and there was a very warm friendly atmosphere. The RCN had really gone the extra mile to make this first Welsh Nurse of the Year a real success. Everybody dressed up in their best frocks and the highlight of the evening was Jason  Mohammad the compare. He was both funny and very pleasant to the eye. That said, I’m probably old enough to be his mum! Nevertheless, I found myself queuing with all the other ladies for a photo with him!! My husband definitely saw a different side to me that night!

The real highlight of the night was when they called out my name as the winner of the specialist award. I was truly delighted and overwhelmed. Sheila Hunt and Ruth Walker Nurse Executive Cardiff and Vale were the first to congratulate me and it was great to have them there to see it. I was on a high for the rest of the week and the week ended with our annual breast ball again at City Hall where all my team congratulated me and gave a public announcement in front of past and present patients. This again was an amazing feeling. I could get quite used to the life of being a celebrity!!

I’m in the mood now for winning and so next year I’m hoping that somebody will nominate me for the research and innovation award because anything’s possible!